myFresha-licious: All About Fats

All About Fats

In a desperate attempt to lose weight and stay fit and healthy I am trying to better understand the factors that will affect the failure and success of my goal.

Losing weight and staying healthy is not just about lowering calorie intake and taking out fats entirely my daily food intake.  Of course, I won’t be able to live without fat in my food since fatty foods are a favorite of mine but then again I have to give up something to gain something, right? And I find that a fair rule.

To cut my blah blahs, I have researched on fats and here is the result.  Their are lots of articles in the internet but my main sources are from Wikipedia.org and about.com

Sharosem(12May2011)

THE BAD FATS

Saturated Fats  : These fats are derived from animal products such as meat, dairy and eggs. But they are also found in some plant-based sources such as coconut, palm and palm kernel oils. These fats are solid at room temperature. Saturated fats directly raise total and LDL (bad) cholesterol levels. Conventional advice says to Avoid them as much as possible. More recently, some have questioned this, as there are different kinds of saturated fats, some of which have at least a neutral effect on cholesterol.

Hydrogenated / Trans Fats:  These are actually unsaturated fats, but they can raise total and LDL (bad)
cholesterol levels while also lowering HDL (good) cholesterol levels. Trans fats are used to extend the shelf life of processed foods, typically cookies, cakes, fries and donuts. Any item that contains “hydrogenated oil” or “partially hydrogenated oil” likely contains trans fats. Hydrogenation is the chemical process that changes liquid oils into solid fats. The tide is turning against trans fats. Since January 2006, all food manufacturers are required to list trans fat content on food labels.

THE GOOD FATS

1) Unsaturated fats

Monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats are two types of unsaturated fatty acids. They are derived from vegetables and plants.

 – Monounsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature but begin to solidify at cold temperatures. This type of fat is preferable to other types of fat and can be found in olives, olive oil, nuts, peanut oil, canola oil and avocados. Some studies have shown that these kinds of fats can actually lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and
maintain HDL (good) cholesterol.

 – Polyunsaturated fats are also liquid at room temperature. These are found in safflower, sesame, corn, cottonseed and soybean oils. This type of fat has also been shown to reduce levels of LDL cholesterol, but too much can also lower your HDL cholesterol.

2) Omega-3 fatty acids

These include an “essential” fatty acid, which means it’s critical for our health but cannot be manufactured by our bodies. Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include cold-water fish, flax seed, soy, and walnuts. These fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and also boost our immune systems.

http://lowfatcooking.about.com/od/lowfatbasics/a/fats1004.htm

Comparative properties of common cooking fats (per 100g)

Total Fat

Saturated Fat

Mono-

Unsatura

ted Fat

Poly-unsatura

ted Fat

Vegetable Shortening (hydrogenated)

71g

23g

8g

37g

182°C (360°F)

Sunflower oil

100g

11g

20g

69g

232°C (450°F)

Soybean oil

100g

16g

23g

58g

232°C (450°F)

Peanut oil

100g

17g

46g

32g

232°C (450°F)

Olive oil

100g

14g

73g

11g

216°C (420°F)

Lard

100g

39g

45g

11g

188°C (370°F)

Suet

94g

52g

32g

3g

200°C (400°F)

Butter

81g

51g

21g

3g

177°C (350°F)

http://en.wikipedia.org